Allied

2016

Action  Drama  Romance  Thriller  War  

Synopsis


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February 15, 2017 at 9:17 pm

Cast

Brad Pitt as Max Vatan
Lizzy Caplan as Bridget Vatan
Marion Cotillard as Marianne Beauséjour
Matthew Goode as Guy Sangster
720p 1080p
915.32 MB
1280*720
English
R
23.976 fps
2hr 4 min
P/S 1,523 / 4,328
1.89 GB
1920*1080
English
R
23.976 fps
2hr 4 min
P/S 1,585 / 4,339

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by David Ferguson ([email protected]) 9 / 10

Keep the emotions real

Greetings again from the darkness. Every writer, director and actor dreams of being part of the next Casablanca ? a timeless movie beloved by so many. It's rare to see such a blatant homage to that classic, but director Robert Zemekis (Oscar winner for Forrest Gump) and writer Steven Knight (Dirty Pretty Things, Eastern Promises) deliver their version with an identical setting, nearly identical costumes, and the re-use of a song ("La Marseillaise") which played such a crucial role.Spy movies typically fall into one of three categories: action (Bourne), flashy/stylish (Bond), or detailed and twisty (Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy). This one has offers a dose of each blended with some romance and a vital "is she or isn't she" plot. The "she" in that last part is French Resistance fighter Marianne Beausejour played by Marion Cotillard. Her introduction here is a thing of beauty, as she floats across the room thrilled to be reuniting with her husband Max Vatan. Of course the catch is that Max is really a Canadian Agent and their marriage is a cover for their mission to assassinate a key Nazi. Yes, it's 1942 in Morocco.The two agents work well together and it's no surprise when this escalates to a real romance between two beautiful and secretive people. It seems only natural that after killing Nazi's and making love in a car during a ferocious sandstorm that the next steps would be marriage, a move to London, and having a kid. It's at this point where viewers will be divided. Those loving the action-spy approach will find the London segment slows the movie to a crawl. Those who prefer intelligence gathering and intrigue may very well enjoy the second half more. What if your assignment was to kill your beloved wife if she were deemed to be a double-agent? Max finds himself in this predicament, and since no one ever says what they mean in the community of spies, he isn't sure if the evidence is legit or if it's really a game to test his own loyalty. This second half loses sight of the larger picture of war, and narrows the focus on whether Max can prove the innocence of Marianne ? of course without letting her know he knows something ? or might know something.Marion Cotillard is stellar in her role. She flashes a warm and beautiful smile that expertly masks her true persona. The nuance and subtlety of her performance is quite impressive. Mr. Pitt does a nice job as the desperate husband hiding his desperation, but his role doesn't require the intricacies of hers. Supporting work comes via Jared Harris, Lizzy Caplan, August Diehl, Marion Bailey, Simon McBurney, and Matthew Goode.The Zemekis team is all in fine form here: Cinematographer Don Burgess captures the feel of the era, Composer Alan Silvestri never tries to overpower a scene, and Costume Designer Joanna Johnston is likely headed for an Oscar nomination. For a spy movie, the story is actually pretty simple and the tension is never over-bearing like we might expect. While watching the performance of Ms. Cotillard, keep in mind her most telling line of dialogue: "I keep the emotions real." It's a strategy that is a bit unusual in her world. How effective it is will be determined by the end of the movie.

Reviewed by ([email protected]) 9 / 10

Duplicitous and Suspenseful!

Quite the duplicitous plot! Robert Zemeckis' Allied released by Paramount Pictures is a thrilling tale of espionage and love. We have certainly seen a few different "spy" movies over the last couple of years; some more about espionage and others more about the drama that ensues afterwards. Fortunately, Allied feels like a genuine spy movie that actually contains espionage. The production design and costumes are a beautiful throwback to the fabulous 40s. You'll find yourself reaching for a glass of champagne and swing dancing to Benny Goodman's timeless big band jazz hit Sing, Sing, Sing. There is one city synonymous with WWII, espionage, and romance and you will appropriately return to that iconic city of Casablanca in Allied. This is definitely not a reimagined Casablanca but there are indirect references to that movie sprinkled throughout this new story. Films like this one require top notch talent, and both Brad Pitt and Marion Cotillard deliver outstanding performances to accompany this staple in film genres. Not limited to the love story between Pitt's and Cotillard's respective characters, the movie also includes some deadly shootout scenes and dangerously close encounters with the Nazis behind enemy lines.Commander and intelligence officer Max Vatan (Pitt) is stationed in the famous city of Casablanca in French Morocco where he teams up with French resistance movement leader Marianne Beausejour (Cotillard). Impressed by her ability to so effectively blend in and create her authentic cover, Vatan soon finds himself falling in love with his partner. Following the assassination of a Nazi ambassador, Beausejour and Vatan flee to London to start their life together. Everything is going beautifully for the happy couple in their second year of marriage with a child when Vatan's superiors confront him with the suspicion that Marianne is in fact a Nazi spy. Refusing to believe it to be true, Max must now conduct his own investigation into his wife's history to protect the ones he loves so dearly.I absolutely adored the look and feel of the film as it echoes the era of the Golden Age of Hollywood. Although this movie plays off a tad listless as a result of failing to elicit a strong emotional response from the audience, it is not without it outstanding elements. It benefits from solid acting and beautiful cinematography as well as some fantastic symbolism. Robert Zemeckis' talent for visual storytelling is clearly visible in this period film. The weakness in the ability to successfully leave a lasting emotional impact on the audience is in the writing and executive producership of Steven Knight (Eastern Promises). For films that are not as much about the spectacle as they are the drama between characters and the challenge faced therein, it is vitally important that the personal/interpersonal relationships transcend the screen and directly impact the audience. All the makings were there for a deeply moving cinematic story, but it just doesn't quite make that transition from the mostly superficial and distant.Mirror, mirror, on the wall...(interesting fun fact: this misquoted line from Snow White is actually "magic mirror on the wall"). But, I digress. The strategic use of mirrors is an incredible use of visual storytelling and symbolism. For those who have studied film or literary rhetoric, the mirror is a classic means of conveying duplicity (two sides, faces, etc of a character). Even without knowing that this was a spy movie, I would have been able to infer that from how the mirrors are shot and placed within the composition of the 24 frames a second. When using powerful symbolism as part of the visual story, it conveys so much more meaning in a scene than words could actually describe. Mirrors have long sense been a powerful metaphor even before moving pictures. But motion pictures allow for a greater use of the importance it plays in a cinematic story. Not limited to duplicity, mirrors can also be used as a metaphor for self-reflection. Whether talking duplicity or reflection, the mirror aids in conveying so much to the audience in this movie.Ordinarily, I am not a fan of classic films getting remakes; however, there are always exceptions when the core or essence of the film is held in tact but the production design, direction, and cinematography are brought up to speed with contemporary cinema. If you're a fan of WWII era films or the timeless spy movie, then you will definitely enjoy Allied. After witnessing the significance of Casablanca in this movie, I am actually looking forward to a remake if there ever is one. Provided. That the overall look and feel of the movie is in line with classical motion picture storytelling. I could definitely see Robert Zemeckis directing a remake of Casablanca. Occasionally there are directors who can strike the balance between classical cinematic storytelling told through contemporary technology, and Zemeckis definitely struck that balance in Allied.Don't allow the weak writing to dissuade you from watching it; there is actually a lot to enjoy in this film. After the slow burn during the first act, acts II and III are full of intrigue and suspense.

Reviewed by nickapopolis87 ([email protected]) 9 / 10

Disappointing and superficial

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

Reviewed by Luke Andrews 9 / 10

Brad Pitt and Marion Cotillard join forces, to make a decent romance.

The film started off well.....even though I knew there would be a plot development coming later regarding the possibility of the wife being a spy for the Nazis. I didn't mind the story of how the two leads got together and ended up in Hampstead in the middle of the war. I didn't mind waiting for the crisis to come up where Brad Pitt doesn't know if his wife is a spy or not. But once it does come up, Brad undertakes some pretty far fetched ventures that could undermine the Allies' security even in order to find out. I was even overlooking that. What finally tore it was the way Brad's wife played by Marion Cotillard handles her own dilemma and crisis. She could have sought help or guidance from Brad OR his superiors, totally versed in the very areas she was struggling with. It indicates that she did not trust her husband in spite of the lovey dovey marriage portrayed. Either that, or she was simply a wimp and a wuss. This made the whole movie rather unbelievable. As for the ending of the film with the letter to her daughter especially, that was superfluous and heavy on the treacle, a very obvious attempt to tug at heartstrings in case the audience doesn't already GET that she really loved her daughter. Last straw, by this time I really didn't care for the film.

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